Burning Permits

Campfires, Fire Pits and Bonfires

Not long ago, lighting a fire in your backyard to burn waste or have a campfire on the beach was commonplace.  However, the pollution and associated health risks caused by smoke (see Backyard Burning brochure) and the increased risk of bushfires means some bonfires require Burning Permits.

Built Up Areas

In central and built up areas, a Burning Permit is required.  Infringements may be issued for burning without a Burning Permit. See Burning Management Areas Map for more details.

Before a Burning Permit is issued, a Fire Control Officer will inspection your property to ensure your fire won't endanger you or your neighbours. Applications for a property inspections are available at the City Civic Centre and Mullewa District Office or online Application for inspection prior to burn (ISMEM06)

Semi-Rural Areas

In semi-rural areas, a Burning Permit is still required however, a property inspection prior to issuing the Burning Permit will be undertaken at the discretion of the Fire Control Officer.

Broad Acre Farming Areas

In broad acre farming areas a Burning Permit is required for burning bush, grass or stubble from 1 September to 14 October and from 15 February to 6 April. Burning of bush, grass and stubble only from 7 April to 31 August is unrestricted (does not require a permit).

Bonfire

Frequently Asked Questions

When am I not allowed to have a campfire or bonfire?

Can I have a fire in my fire pit or pizza oven in my backyard?

Can I have a cooking fire, campfire or bonfire on City owned or managed land?

Aren’t backyard fires bad for your health and the environment?

What are the alternatives to backyard burning?

What other regulations apply to a Burning Permit?

 

When am I not allowed to have a campfire or bonfire?

Fires are not permitted during fire ban periods, on days when a Total Fire Ban has been declared by DFES, on days with a fire danger rating of ‘High’ or a Harvest and Vehicle Movement Ban has been declared by the City. For the current fire danger forecast visit our home page or bom.gov.au

During the prohibited burning period from October to February, fires in fire pits or BBQs are only allowed for the purpose of cooking and the following

FIre dnager rating sign

Can I have a fire in my fire pit or pizza oven in my backyard?

Yes, charcoal or wood fires in a barbecue, fire pit or pizza oven for the purpose of cooking ONLY can be lit but may not cause excessive smoke, irritation or annoyance to others.

All cooking with fires must be supervised and once your food is cooked the fire must be extinguished.

During the prohibited fire burning period from October to February fires in fire pits are strongly discouraged to comply with legislation and ensure sparks and embers escaping the fire do not cause a bushfire.

Do not use any of the above cooking appliances during total fire ban periods, on days with a fire danger rating of ‘High’ or when a Harvest Vehicle Ban has been declared. Gas appliances in which the flame is encapsulated by the appliance are exempt.

 Fire pit

 

Can I have a cooking fire, campfire or bonfire on City owned or managed land?

No, fires are not permitted on City of Greater Geraldton owned/controlled lands which include public open spaces, bush land, coastal reserves and beaches.

This does not apply to gas appliances which do not consume solid fuel comprising of a flame of which is encapsulated by the appliance.

 

Aren’t backyard fires bad for your health and the environment?

Yes, backyard fires cause unnecessary air pollution which results in numerous calls to the City regarding pollution and smoke complaints.  Wood smoke is can be dangerous for people with respiratory problems.  For more information see Backyard Burning brochure.

 

What are the alternatives to backyard burning?

You can mulch your green waste at home and use it on your garden or you can take your green waste to the Meru Waste Facility where it will be mulched. This mulch is free to residents.

Carting away green waste

 

What other regulations apply to a Burning Permit?

All inflammable materials must be cleared a minimum of five meters away from the bonfire location and at least 1 person must be present at all times when the fire is burning. The fire must be extinguished with water or earth once the fire is no longer required.  The fire must be fully extinguished prior to midnight.

For more details see Bush Fire Regulations 1954 and Bush Fires Act 1954.